Are You Due? What to Do When You Get a Renewal Notice


Your business relies on any number of service providers. You’re likely contracting for domain names, website hosting, data backup, software licenses, to name just a few. And that’s only your online presence! So, when a renewal notice comes in, you might just forward it on or file it away for future reference. Here’s what you should be doing instead.


First, when you get a renewal notice, you should confirm that it’s legitimate. This is especially true of domain names. Your business’s domain name and expiration date are publicly available. Anyone could look them up and send you an invoice. Scammers do. They monitor expiring domain names and then send out emails or convincing physical notices telling you it’s time to renew. They are not doing this as a civic service!


Instead, they will be trying to get you to switch your domain services to a competitor or, worse, hoping you'll pay your renewal fee to their account, which has no connection to your domain.


Look out for the following indicators that the notice is a fraud:


  • The price is much more than you’d expect.

  • The deadline is within seven days.

  • You don’t know the business name.

  • This business has never contacted you before.

  • The notice requires you to send a check.


Handling Authentic Renewal Notices


Once you’ve determined the authenticity of the renewal notice, you’ll want to take stock. Putting your licenses or other online services on auto-renewal plans can be easier, but it may not be cost effective. Before re-upping your plan consider:


  • Are you still using this service?

  • Do you really still need it?

  • Do your current needs meet your current plan?

  • Should you upgrade or downsize?


You might also contact your provider directly and ask:


  • Is there a better product available now?

  • Are you eligible for a loyalty discount?


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